Cold War Samurai – The 14th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 1987 – 1991

This site's the panther's roar! Photo of 549 courtesy of Mr. Akira Watanabe of nabe3saviation.web.fc2.com


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What the “neighbors” thought of F-16s at Misawa

The Soviets did not wait long to criticize the decision to base F-16s at Misawa. And they did so more often than they changed leaders, which was a lot in the 1980s. Brezhnev was the big guy when the decision was announced. On the same day the basing decision was announced by Japanese and American officials, 30 September 1982, the official Soviet news agency, Tass, “…denounced the Japanese decision to allow the U.S. to deploy F-16 fighter-bombers on the island of Honshu,” calling the decision “hostile and provocative.” Tass said Japan was making “another move escalating tension and enhancing the threat of war in the Far East,” and that the increased U.S. military presence would put Japan at the forefront of any U.S.-Soviet armed conflict. (Tass Scores F-16 Deployment, 30 Sep 1982)

Lenid Brezhnev, General Secretary of the CP of the USSR, 8 April 1966 – 10 November 1982. (Courtesy Wikipedia)

Lenid Brezhnev, General Secretary of the CP of the USSR, 8 April 1966 – 10 November 1982. (Courtesy Wikipedia)

Brezhnev soon passed away, on 10 November 1982, and was replaced by Yuri Andropov. Communist writers in their innumerable publications continued to express their unhappiness with the plan for F-16’s at Misawa, as in this 1983 example: “…the recent (Japanese) government decision to the deployment at the U.S. military base in Misawa of 50 F-16 fighter bombers capable of bombing the Soviet Union serves as nothing other than a new manifestation of hostility and ill intentions in respect of the Soviet Union.”

Yuri Andropove, General Secretary of the CP of the USSR, 12 November 1982 – 9 February 1984 (Courtesy Wikipedia)

Yuri Andropov, General Secretary of the CP of the USSR, 12 November 1982 – 9 February 1984 (Courtesy Wikipedia)

The critique continued, “Both political circles and the press of Japan regard this step as an attempt to change in its favor the evolved military balance in the Far East and establish its superiority in the air space adjacent to the Soviet borders.” (Soviet-Japanese Relations at the Present Stage, Feb 1983)

Konstantin Chernenko, General Secretary of the CP of the USSR, 13 February 1984 – 10 March 1985 (Courtesy Wikipedia)

Konstantin Chernenko, General Secretary of the CP of the USSR, 13 February 1984 – 10 March 1985 (Courtesy Wikipedia)

In February, 1984, Konstantin Chernenko succeeded the deceased Andropov. The Kremlin continued its criticism of the U.S. presence at Misawa through the period between the announcement and the actual basing of F-16s there. They hoped to pressure Japan into abandoning the decision, and kept up their propaganda and disinformation campaign into the time when the first Vipers were slated to arrive.

The Soviets got yet another leader when an ailing Chernenko died in March, 1985, the third Soviet leader to die  in office in less than three years.  He was replaced by Mikhail Gorbachev, who would remain at the Soviet helm until the end of the Cold War and the demise of the Soviet Union.

Mikhail Gorbachev, General Secretary of the CP of the USSR, 11 March 1985 – 24 August 1991 (Courtesy Wikipedia)

Mikhail Gorbachev, General Secretary of the CP of the USSR, 11 March 1985 – 24 August 1991 (Courtesy Wikipedia)

But as Gorbachev assumed power, nothing really changed in the Soviet dislike of the Misawa F-16 plan, soon to be implemented, and they renewed their efforts to derail it:

“As part of the Soviets’ 1985 campaign to threaten Japan into a withdrawal of support from the United States, the Soviet press built up the issue of the U.S. F-16’s at Misawa. The USSR accused Japan of supporting the U.S. in its buildup of offensive capabilities there. Accusations included:

• Basing of “nuclear-capable” F-16’s;

• Permitting existence of an “underground nuclear arsenal”;

• Providing a command post for directing nuclear, chemical and bacteriological warfare against the Northwest Pacific.

The implicit threat was clarified by citing that

‘it would be naive to believe that the states to which the systems threaten will not take counter-measures to neutralize the new danger emanating from Japanese territory.’

In other words, if it continues to host U.S. forces, Japan faces Soviet nuclear strikes. This threat was declared despite Soviet acknowledgement that the forces are managed by Washington, not by Tokyo.” (TASS Cites Pravda on F-16 Deployment in Japan, 15 April 1985)

Despite Soviet opposition, the plan was implemented. But the commie whining continued as the 432TFW activated and as the 13TFS started operations:

“The American armed forces in South Korea and Japan as well as the ships of the 7th Fleet off the coasts of the USSR and China represent the forward-based forces that are aimed, first and foremost, against the Soviet Union and other countries of socialism.” “Misawa on the island of Honshu is the outpost of the American Air Force.” (CPSU on the Historical Mission of Socialism, March 1986)

Panther F-16As four ship returns to base, circa 1985 (Courtesy Skywarriors gallery.com)

Panther F-16A four ship returns to base, circa 1985 (Courtesy Skywarriors gallery.com)

And the Bolshevik complaining persisted even after the 14TFS started up at Misawa:

“The United States is expanding its military presence in the (Pacific) region,” a June, 1987 article opined. “With Tokyo’s tacit consent Washington is systematically violating the “three nonnuclear principles” – U.S. F-16 aircraft designed to deliver nuclear strikes are deployed at the Misawa base…” (The Course if the Peoples’ Security, 9 June 1987)

14TFS F-16C Block 30 85-1588 at Yokota AB, Japan, circa 1987 (Courtesy Mable.com)

14TFS F-16C Block 30 85-1558 at Yokota AB, Japan, circa 1987 (Courtesy Mablehome.com)

There would be more Soviet complaints in various statements and publications about Misawa F-16s through the rest of the Cold War. Call it information warfare of a sort – they were obsessed with their Marxist socialist politics and wacky way of looking at the world. It was like a leaky commie faucet with a constant drip, drip, drip…

We didn’t pay much attention to it; it was all high level stuff echelons above us and if we had any response to such remarks it was usually a chuckle to see how they regarded us and at the vast gap between truth and fiction. Their rhetoric caused us no concern – perhaps they were envious of us to be so favorably based in Japan as compared to some of their boondock flying bases in some awful places out there in the Far East. Even more, we had awesome new fighter aircraft fresh from the factory and some great airspace for flying. Who wasn’t jealous of that?

F-16s of Misawa AB, Japan. (Courtesy USAF)

F-16s of Misawa AB, Japan. (Courtesy USAF)

References

“Tass Scored F-16 Deployment” carried in Stanford University document, Issue Date: October 15, 1982, accessed at: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CCIQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.stanford.edu%2Fgroup%2Ftomzgroup%2Fpmwiki%2Fuploads%2F2229-1982-10-15-FoF-a-SJJ.doc&ei=_3WJU5SpF8HhoATdnIDAAQ&usg=AFQjCNFzjkC1aJkmFdiSyAvWzOZMIUp50w&bvm=bv.68191837,d.cGU

Latyshev, I., “Soviet-Japanese Relations at the Present Stage,” Mirovaya Ekonomika I Mezhdunarodnyye Otnosheniya, No. 2, Feb, 1983, pp 27-36, excerpt accessed at: http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a368753.pdf

TASS Cites Pravda on F-16 Deployment in Japan, 15 April 1985, cited in “Japan-USSR: trade, technology transfer, and Implications for U.S., by Trombley, David L., Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, June, 1988, accessed at: http://calhoun.nps.edu/public/handle/10945/23062

Editorial, “CPSU on the Historical Mission of Socialism,” in Moscow Problemy Dalnego Vostoka, No. 1, Jan – Mar 1986, pp 3-13, excerpts accessed at: DTIC website, JPRS-UFE-86-004 8 October 1986 FBIS USSR Report Problems of the Far East, No 1, Jan Mar 1986

Senchuk, V., “The Course is the Peoples’ Security – On the Basis of New Thinking,” in Moscow Krasnaya Zvezda, 9 June 1987, First Edition, page 3, DTIC Website, FBIS JPRS Report JPRS-TAC-87-047 16 July 1987, Arms Control, accessed at: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CEMQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fhandle.dtic.mil%2F100.2%2FADA358817&ei=KuyIU9qQKY74oATvxID4Bw&usg=AFQjCNGMMR4mx8DHwYVK5rtZZ5wN-5iU1A&bvm=bv.67720277,d.cGU

List of General Secretaries of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Secretary_of_the_Communist_Party_of_the_Soviet_Union

Misawa F-16 photo at:  http://www.misawa.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/web/070103-F-9322E-062.JPG

F-16A 4-ship image at:  http://skywarriors-gallery.com/usaf%20432tfw.htm

14TFS F-16C image at:  http://www.mablehome.com/aviation/gd/f-16c/f-16c.htm

 

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14TFS Organization

During the late Cold War period, the 14TFS was composed of approximately 50 personnel, mostly pilots. The squadron did not have any maintenance personnel assigned. The Air Force periodically reorganizes and either adds or takes away about 200 maintainers in a fighter squadron.

But in 1987, the squadron did not include the maintainers and was thus relatively small. It changed after the Cold War in 1992 with the USAF introduction of the “objective wing” when the maintainers were once again assigned to flying squadrons. I think a lot of people objected, but got reorganized anyway.

As it was organized from 1987-1991, the squadron was composed in the following manner:
Commander, an F-16 pilot, A-prefix AFSC 1115Q, Lt Col/O-5 rank, and managed one desk on the ground and led from one in the sky. Also had to attend many wing staff meetings, a painful necessity in the modern day and age, even in the age before Powerpoint.

Operations Officer, an F-16 pilot, supervised the day-to-day operations of the squadron, ensuring the pilots assigned to the squadron’s four lettered flights, A, B, C and D Flights, got the mission done. Taskmaster, as required, to do so. Usually had an Assistant Ops Officer or two as well.

Flight Commanders, F-16 pilots, of the four lettered flights, A Flight, B Flight, C Flight and D Flight, with at least a half-dozen pilots in each flight.

Executive Officer, ground echelon type (AFSC 7016?), made sure squadron administration was in order.

Flight Safety Officer, one F-16 pilot assigned this duty.

Maintenance Liaison Officer, one F-16 pilot assigned this duty.

Ops/Admin, the Duty Desk, nerve center of the squadron’s current operations, run by around eight Enlisted Operations Specialists (271X0) led by an NCO.

Life Support, about a half-dozen Enlisted Life Support Specialists (922X0) led by an NCO who kept in order all the gear that kept the pilots going in the aircraft, helmet, oxygen mask, g-suit, etc.

Scheduling, F-16 pilots, ensured all assigned Mission Ready and Mission Capable pilots had the required hours in different types of training to ensure their currency in the aircraft and associated weapons. They were constantly juggling sorties, times, events, etc; a very dynamic operation, with changes constantly occurring.

Weapons and Tactics, F-16 pilot, Fighter Weapons School Graduate, S-prefix type (Fighter Weapons Instructor), headed up this section. Weapons was the brain trust on own weapons system capabilities, tactics and employment. Had some other pilots to help, if available.

The squadron also had some “attached” personnel, folks assigned to a wing staff position but who flew or worked with the squadron on a regular basis. Several of these attached folks would also join the squadron for their exercise/wartime duty.

– Pilots attached to the Samurai came from various wing staff positions in Plans, Safety, Scheduling, Stan Eval, Training and Weapons. We even had a pilot from HQ Fifth Air Force at Yokota AB who was lucky to have a staff billet which allowed him to fly the F-16 at Misawa while on staff at Fifth Air Force. The Deputy Commander for Operations (DO) also flew with the squadron.

– The squadron also had a Flight Surgeon (AFSC 9356?) who was dedicated to keeping the pilots good to go, healthwise, and he flew with the squadron as well, in the back-seat of the family model.

– Samurai Intelligence, brain trust on the adversary order of battle, capabilities, tactics and employment, usually an Intel Officer (8075) and Enlisted Airmen (201X0) attached to the squadron by the wing Intel shop.


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The 14th PRS/TRS/TFS/FS Roll of Honor

Although this web log is focused on the 14TFS era of the squadron’s existence from 1987 to 1991, on occasions like Memorial Day it is appropriate to remember the Airmen of the 14th who gave their all for our country and our freedom since the squadron was first formed on 20 June 1942. This is the first version of the 14th’s Roll of Honor (lacking WWII information at this time).  Hand Salute!

Bancroft, William W. Jr. 1Lt, 14TRS. KIA on 13 Nov 1970 in RF-4C 66-0420; shot down by AAA during day over Route Pack I, NVN.

Behnfeldt, Roger E., Capt, 14TRS. MIA on 19 Aug 1972 in RF-4C 69-0355; shot down by SAM during day over Route Pack 6A, NVN. Postwar body recovered.

Bergevin, Charles L., 1Lt, 14TRS. MIA on 23 Aug 1968 in RF-4C 66-0466; shot down by fighter at night over Route Pack I, NVN. Postwar determined dead.

Brown, Donald A., Capt, 14TRS. MIA on 29 Jul 1970, in RF-4C 66-0436; shot down by fighter over Laos. Postwar determined dead.

Chavez, Gary A., Capt, 14TRS. MIA on 29 Jul 1970, in RF-4C 66-0436; shot down by fighter over Laos. Postwar determined dead.

Cuthbert, Bradley B., Capt, 14TRS. KIA on 23 Nov 1968 in RF-4C 66-0445; shot down by AAA during day over Route Pack I, NVN.

Edgar, Robert J., 1Lt, 14TRS. MIA on 4 Feb 1968, in RF-4C 66-0443; shot down by fighter at dawn over Laos. Postwar determined dead.

Gist, Tommy E., Capt, 14TRS. MIA on 18 May 1968 in RF-4C 66-0442; shot down by fighter during day over Route Pack I, NVN. Postwar determined dead.

Hicks, Terrin D., Capt, 14TRS. MIA on 15 Aug 1968 in RF-4C 66-0447; shot down by AAA during day over I Corps, SVN. Postwar determined dead.

Newendorp, James V., Capt, 14TRS. KIA on 1 Oct 1971 in RF-4C 66-0439; shot down by possible AAA during day over III Corps area, SVN.

Ott, William A., Capt, 14TFS. MIA on 8 Oct 1970 in RF-4C 68-0610; shot down by fighter at dusk over Laos. Postwar determined dead.

Palmer, Gilbert S., Jr., Maj, 14TRS. MIA on 27 Feb 1968 in RF-4C 66-0431; shot down by fighter during day over Route Package I, NVN. Postwar determined dead.

Potter, William T., 1Lt, 14TRS. MIA on 4 Feb 1968 in RF-4C 66-0443, shot down by fighter at dawn over Laos. Postwar determined dead.

Setterquist, Francis L., 1Lt, 14TRS. MIA on 23 Aug 1968 in RF-4C 66-0466; shot down by fighter at night over Route Pack I, NVN. Postwar determined dead.

Shay, Donald E., Jr., Capt, 14TRS. MIA on 8 Oct 1970 in RF-4C 68-0610; shot down by fighter at dusk over Laos. Postwar determined dead.

Simpson, Melvin Brice, 1Lt, 14FS. Died 17 Sep 1998 from injuries sustained in F-16C 90-0804; in takeoff accident on 24 Jul 1998 at Misawa Air Base, Japan.

Sneed, Warren B., Capt, 14FS. Lost at sea on 13 Nov 2000 in Misawa-based F-16C 90-0801; in mid-air collision with another F-16 west of Hokkaido, Japan, during Exercise Keen Sword.

Townsend, Francis W., 1Lt, 14TRS. MIA on 13 Aug 1972 in RF-4C 68-0604; shot down by AAA during day over Route Pack I, NVN. Postwar determined dead.

Williams, Billie Joe, 14TRS. MIA on 9 Dec 1972 in RF-4C 68-0597; shot down by SAM during day over Route Pack III. Postwar body recovered.

Wright, David I., Maj, 14TRS. KIA on 13 Nov 1970 in RF-4C 66-0420; shot down by AAA during day over Route Pack I, NVN.

Wright, Thomas T., Capt, 14TRS. MIA on 27 Feb 1968 in RF-4C 66-0431; shot down by fighter during day over Route Package I, NVN. Postwar determined dead.

References

RF-4C losses in SE Asia, at: http://www.docstoc.com/docs/48551247/Vietnam-Memories-RF-4C-Loss-Chronology

14FS F-16 losses, at: http://www.f-16.net/aircraft-database/F-16/mishaps-and-accidents/airforce/USAF/406/


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14TFS Samurai Heritage

The lineage of the 14TFS goes back to World War II, when it started in 1942 as a Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron in the Lockheed F-4 Photo Lightning.

Emb;em of the 14th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, adapted by its successor, the 14th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron (Courtesy Togetherweserved.com)

Emblem of the 14th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Bugs Bunny flying a stylized, lightning bolt powered, F-4 Photo Lightning.  It was adopted by its successor, the 14th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron (Courtesy Togetherweserved.com)

The unit moved overseas in 1943 to fly combat photo recon missions with the Lockheed F-5 Photo Lightning, as well as the Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. XI, in the European Theater of Operations as part of Eighth Air Force. Late in the war, the squadron also flew the North American P-51D Mustang as a recon escort against the Me-262 jet fighter threat.

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. XI as flown by the 14PRS from England in World War II. (Courtesy Deviantart.net)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. XI as flown by the 14PRS from England in World War II. (Courtesy Deviantart.net)

After brief postwar periods as a photo recon squadron, and later as a troop carrier squadron in the reserve component, the unit was activated in the Vietnam War as a McDonnell Douglas RF-4C Phantom II outfit. Based in Thailand during that war, the 14th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron and was heavily involved in the air war over Southeast Asia.

AN RF-4C of the 432d Tactical Recon Wing's 14th Tactical Recon Squadron takes off from Udorn Royal Thai Air Force Base during the Vietnam War. (Courtesy Wikipedia)

AN RF-4C of the 432d Tactical Recon Wing’s 14th Tactical Recon Squadron takes off from Udorn Royal Thai Air Force Base during the Vietnam War. (Courtesy Wikipedia)

The 14TRS was inactivated after that war in 1975, and remained so until it was redesignated as a Tactical Fighter Squadron on 5 June 1984. This was the same date of the redesignations of the 432d Tactical Fighter Wing and 13th Tactical Fighter Squadron.

Once the 14TFS was activated at Misawa Air Base, Japan, on 1 January 1987, it built up combat capability with personnel and equipment in the first half of that year. The first General Dynamics F-16C Block 30s started arriving in the squadron in the spring of 1987, fresh from the factory at Ft. Worth, Texas. The squadron was commanded by Lt Col David Hamilton – more on this outstanding combat-proven leader later.

General Dynamic F-16C Block 30, s/n 85-1544 wearing 14TFS black and yellow checks at Luke AFB, AZ in the spring of 1987, enroute to the Pacific.  Note the ubiquitous USAF green mobility bag on the ramp beneath the wing.  (Courtesy Deviantart.com)

General Dynamic F-16C Block 30, s/n 85-1544 wearing 14TFS black and yellow checks at Luke AFB, AZ in the spring of 1987, enroute to the Pacific. Note the ubiquitous USAF green mobility bag on the ramp beneath the wing. (Courtesy Deviantart.com)

Following the Gulf War of 1991, as part of an AF-wide reorganization the unit was redesignated as the 14th Fighter Squadron on 31 May 1991, a designation which remains in effect. The “T” word was now verboten! A full lineage and honors statement of the squadron can be found in a Fact Sheet on the Air Force Historical Research Agency Website at:
http://www.afhra.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet_print.asp?fsID=9807
References

Thole, Dave, “Flying Lightning: The History of the 14th Fighter Squadron,” Writers Club Press, Lincoln, NE, 2001

14PRS emblem at: http://airforcephotos.togetherweserved.com/286918.jpg

Spitfire PR Mk. XI artwork at: http://th04.deviantart.net/fs71/PRE/f/2010/102/8/2/828b8c2d0c1b6b35c8d34477cdf2599f.jpg

14TRS RF-4C Image at: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rf-4c-14trs-udon.jpg

F-16C at Luke image at: http://www.deviantart.com/morelikethis/artists/213286957?view_mode=2


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14TFS Samurai Beginnings

The emblem of the 14th Tactical Fighter Squadron

The emblem of the USAF’s 14th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 1987 – 1991

The origins of the 14TFS Samurai presence at Misawa Air Base go back to the Cold War, that great struggle between democracy and communism, between freedom and tyranny. Although there were many crises and incidents in the period following World War II, the Iranian hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan were unsettling events for an America already bruised by the Vietnam War and its outcome.

In November, 1980, Americans elected Ronald W. Reagan as the nation’s 40th president. It was during the Reagan years that a post-Vietnam American military, neglected and in need of revitalization, was rebuilt and built up in light of the ever-present threat of communist arms and expansion of influence.

Given the good relations between the US and Japan, especially so during the Reagan-Nakasone era, the USAF developed a plan to reintroduce tactical aircraft at Misawa Air Base in northern Japan, from which such aircraft had been absent since 1971 after the drawdowns of the Vietnam War. At least one source indicates that the A-10 was considered, but that changed and the tank-busting aircraft instead went to Suwon Air Base, Korea, in January, 1982.

Prime Minister Nakasone and President Reagan review troops in Tokyo, May, 1986 (Courtesy Wikipedia)

Prime Minister Nakasone and President Reagan review troops in Tokyo, May, 1986 (Courtesy Wikipedia)

USAF planning continued, and with the approval of the Government of Japan, the United States worked out an agreement for tactical aircraft at Misawa. On 30 September 1982, Fifth Air Force announced intent to base F-16s fighters at Misawa. This announcement was in conjunction with a 30 September meeting in Washington, D.C. between U.S. Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and Japanese Defense Minister Soichiro Ito. The two signed an agreement the same day which provided for up to 50 F-16s to be stationed at Misawa.

“The U.S. Defense Department Sept. 30 released a statement saying that the “proposed deployment of the multi-mission F-16 would improve the military balance in the Far East, demonstrate U.S. commitment to mutual defense in the Far East and enhance the deterrence strength of the U.S.-Japan security relationship.”

The statement maintained that the plan did not signal a change in U.S. strategy in the Pacific, but was designed to “correct a deficiency in U.S. tactical air power which has been brought about by the Soviet build-up in the Far East.”

An Air Force spokesman added that the Pacific region was to take on a greater importance in U.S. military strategy “to assume a more global perspective.” He argued that the U.S. build-up of air power in northern Asia was necessary because the U.S. had only a “relatively small force” there, although it was of sufficient quality.

The spokesman contended that the Soviet Union had three times as many fighters on its Pacific coast as the U.S. had in its entire Pacific force.” (Source: Japan: U.S. to Station Jets on Honshu)

The decision to again base fighters in Misawa soon appeared to be a prudent move, bolstering the US-Japan alliance as tensions with the Soviet Union escalated. A scant year later, on 1 September 1983, the tragic loss of Korean Air Lines Flight 007 occurred. The B-747 jumbo jet was shot down by Soviet interceptor aircraft after it accidentally strayed into communist airspace. This was a flash point in the Cold War.

A Soviet Su-15 FLAGON interceptor, based at Dolinsk-Sokol Airfield on Sakhalin Island,  fires upon Korean Air Lines Flight 007, 1 September 1983 (Courtesy AF Magazine, Illustration by Zaur Eylanbekov)

A Soviet Su-15 FLAGON interceptor, based at Dolinsk-Sokol Airfield on Sakhalin Island, fires upon Korean Air Lines Flight 007, 1 September 1983 (Courtesy AF Magazine, Illustration by Zaur Eylanbekov)

On 1 July 1984, the 432d Tactical Fighter Wing activated at Misawa Air Base. The 13TFS activated next at Misawa on 1 June 1985 and was initially equipped with the F-16A (received from Shaw AFB as Shaw received newer F-16s). After a 14 year absence, USAF fighters again were based at Misawa.

432TFW flagship F-16A Block 15 serial number 83-1115 and wingman cruise over the ocean (Courtesy F-16.net, photo by Katsuhiko Tokunaga)

432TFW flagship F-16A Block 15 serial number 83-1115 and a 13TFS wingman cruise over the ocean (Courtesy F-16.net, photo by Katsuhiko Tokunaga)

Last but not least, and fulfilling the 1982 agreement, the 14TFS was activated at Misawa on 1 January 1987 – the Samurai had arrived!

14TFS F-16C Block 30 serial number 85-1560 is ready for a sortie at Misawa AB, Japan in September, 1987.  Note the small, blue BDU-33 practice bombs mounted on a triple ejector rack beneath the wing, for use at the nearby Ripsaw Range just north of the base. (Courtesy NABE3's Aviation Photo Gallery)

14TFS F-16C Block 30 serial number 85-1560 is ready for a sortie at Misawa AB, Japan in September, 1987. Note the small, blue BDU-33 practice bombs mounted on a triple ejector rack beneath the wing, for use at the nearby Ripsaw Range just north of the base. (Courtesy Mr. Akira Watanabe of NABE3’s Aviation Photo Gallery)

References

“History of Misawa Air Base,” accessed at: http://www.misawajapan.com/aboutmisawa/then-now.asp

“Japan, the U.S. and South Korea: A New Alliance Takes Shape,” The Multinational Monitor, February 1983 – Volume 4 – Number 2, accessed at: http://www.multinationalmonitor.org/hyper/issues/1983/02/shorrock-alliance.html

“Japan: U.S. to Station Jets on Honshu,” accessed at: http://www.stanford.edu/…/2229-1982-10-15-FoF-a-SJJ.doc

Korean Air Lines Flight 007, Wikipedia entry, at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_Air_Lines_Flight_007

Grier, Peter, “The Death of Korean Air Lines Flight 007,” AF Magazine, January, 2013, at:  http://www.airforcemag.com/magazinearchive/pages/2013/january%202013/0113korean.aspx

14TFS F-16C Block 30 85-1560 image at:  http://nabe3saviation.web.fc2.com/aF161u.html

432TFW F-16A Flagship photo at:  http://www.f-16.net/g3/f-16-photos/album38/album69/83-1115_003

432TFW Lineage and Honors Fact Sheet, accessed at: http://www.afhra.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=15166

13TFS Lineage and Honors Fact Sheet, accessed at: http://www.misawa.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=6963

14TFS Lineage and Honors Fact Sheet, accessed at: http://www.afhra.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet_print.asp?fsID=9807